Meet Rev. Nate Klug

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Nate Klug

Pastor, Arlington Community Church

Nate was born in the Midwest, grew up in Massachusetts, and has been living in California since 2015. He is a graduate of the University of Chicago and Yale Divinity School, and he previously served UCC churches in Iowa and Redwood City, California.

Nate loves to preach, offer pastoral care, lead discussions and studies, and engage with people of all ages. He is especially excited about the opportunity to work with the people of Arlington Community Church to envision a creative future for ministries of community outreach and creation justice, as reflected in the congregation’s Covenant for Life Together.

Besides parish ministry, Nate’s other calling is writing. He is the author of two books of poetry, and his writing appears in The Nation, The New York Review of Books, and The Best American Poetry 2018. Nate teaches creative writing workshops at the Graduate Theological Union and serves on the board of the Center for the Arts and Religion at the GTU.

Nate is married to Rev. Kit Novotny, an associate minister at First Church Berkeley (UCC). They live in Albany with their young daughter, Zoe May, and their terrier, Increase. They love to eat at the Butcher’s Son deli and praise God for the Ohlone Greenway, where they can often be found jogging, riding bikes, or pushing a stroller.

Rev. Nate’s Contact & Weekly Schedule

Nate loves to visit folks and to get to know them through all the ups and downs of life. Nate can be reached at revnateklug@gmail.com. In the case of a pastoral emergency, he can be reached at any time on his cell phone at (617) 549-8178. Nate would love to hear how God is moving in your life; please do contact him to set up a visit.

As a ¾ time pastor, Nate will be in the church office on Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. Mondays and Tuesdays will primarily devoted to his writing and teaching.

Nate will be experimenting with holding office hours at a local coffee shop or pub in the coming weeks. Stay tuned!

Moment for the Planet

Moment for the Planet

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Robbie Bond

Kids Speak for Parks

There is a Moment for the Planet at the Sunday service at the Arlington Community Church to highlight an aspect of the environment or helpful knowledge. This past week we honored a young boy called Robbie Bond, who in 2017, at age 9 launched a Kids Speak for Parks after hearing about the executive order from the president to downsize or eliminate some national parks.

Over the summer, he and his parents visited more than a dozen national parks recording videos of him exploring, talking to local officials, and making friends. He wanted to share with other kids across the country about the beauty of our parks and the threat from oil and gas exploration.

He collected 5,000 signatures in support of the parks, spoke to local schools, and even traveled to Washington to meet with Interior Department officials and representatives from his native state of Hawaii. Now at age 10, he is working on a pilot for a documentary series to create a virtual reality "field trips" to the national monuments.

He is partnering with Google to do this. Robbie's message to young and old: "Make you voice heard. I think it's best to have kids' voices. If the monuments were to be destroyed, it would have a bigger impact on kids."

In Conclusion

In Conclusion

This may, or may not, be my last entry. A brief recapitulation of thoughts follows:

My observation-based suggestions to you can be summarized in two words:

  1. Hospitality

  2. Transparency

The rest, as they say, is commentary.

If you wish to subscribe to any more periodicals, I'd recommend highly "Sojourners" and "Christian Century." They both offer great information, inspiration, and insight.

The February issue of "Sojourners" reminds us,

The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) required public spaces to accommodate disabled people by providing ramps, designated parking, and wheelchair lifts. Yet Christian churches and schools lobbied against the bill, claiming the cost of these features would represent government intrusion into religious affairs... Christians stood alone against access for disabled people...[which prompts this reflection] "Disabled people didn't leave the church,...The church didn't even leave us. No, we were never welcome."

Hospitality requires intention, effort, deep conversation, and resources.

On Sunday my final report will be available to all of you; in it I offer several suggestions as well as some encouragement. Please get a copy.

Finally, on Sunday I will be speaking on the theme, "Live Your Vision." Your vision changes over time. Nevertheless it requires a living-into action in order to make it real; only by such effort will you be aware of how things must continue to change. Blessings on that endeavor.

- Rev. Dennis Alger

Do You Have One? Is It Available?

Do You Have One? Is It Available?

Thanks to Dudley Thompson who loaned his copy to me, I just read Jessica Nutik Zitter's Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life. This medical doctor, now an "Intensivist," chronicles her journey through the technological fixes of keeping us alive at all costs to the recognition that death is not failure AND can be both planned for and better managed often.

As I read it I was reminded that my wife and I have Advance Directives in several locations. However, they ought to be updated-especially in regard to our health care proxies since we are no longer near those listed. Dr. Zitter admits that she has no Advance Directive (sometimes termed Living Will) because it feels so final to complete the form. True. But the consequences of having nothing on file, and even worse, no conversation about end of life matters with loved ones (as well as physicians and clergy) can make for challenging and stressful situations. I've seen them...

So, have the conversation, again, and make certain the forms are up to date. Take a copy to your doctor; take one to your church; and when you go to the hospital, even for outpatient surgery, take one along. They will ask.

Speaking of end-of-life realities, some souls think so highly of the church that they leave a bequest to their congregation, often undesignated (which is better, often, than designated for something the congregation doesn't prioritize, such as a statue of a favorite preacher). I remember with great fondness a woman who left several thousand dollars to the congregation I served in Oregon. Not only were we surprised but quite appreciative. Knowing her as I did, I knew she would much rather those funds go toward assisting ministry somewhere than beautifying the sanctuary. Since we were in partnership with a congregation in Gingoog City, Mindanao, we used those funds in conjunction with that partnership: we shipped school supplies and other resources, plus we contributed to the pastor's continuing education (she is now a bishop in the United Church of Christ in the Philippines). So, please consider a bequest to your congregation. One caveat: Be specific about the beneficiary. A sad story: I know a congregation which went through a lot of distress over a bequest. A member left $100,000 to The United Church of Christ, as the congregation was known in that community. However, did that person mean that congregation or the denomination? Specificity matters.

For today, tomorrow, and many more to come, stay healthy.

- Rev. Dennis Alger

Meet Rev. Nate Klug

Meet Rev. Nate Klug

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Rev. Nate Klug

ACC Designated Term Pastor, March 2019

Rev. Nate Klug was born in Minneapolis and grew up outside of Boston. Nate is a 2013 graduate of Yale Divinity School, and he previously served UCC churches in Iowa and Redwood City, California, where he worked for the last two years. Nate treasures parish ministry for the way it brings him into contact with glimpses of God’s grace, from the mundane to the exceptional, every day.

Nate loves to preach, offer pastoral care, lead discussions and studies, and engage with people of all ages. He is especially excited about the opportunity to work with the people of Arlington Community Church to envision a creative future for ministries of community outreach and creation justice, as reflected in the congregation’s Covenant for Life Together.

Besides parish ministry, Nate’s other calling is writing and teaching. He is the author of two books of poetry, and his writing appears in The Nation, The New York Review of Books, and The Best American Poetry 2018. Nate teaches creative writing workshops at the Graduate Theological Union and serves on the board of the Center for the Arts and Religion at the GTU.

Nate is married to Rev. Kit Novotny, an associate minister at First Church Berkeley (UCC). They live in Albany with their seven-month-old daughter, Zoe May, and their terrier, Increase. They love to eat at the Butcher’s Son deli and praise God for the Ohlone Greenway, where they can often be found jogging, riding bikes, or pushing a stroller.

On Sunday January 27, the congregation of Arlington Community Church voted by ballot unanimously to call Rev. Nate Klug to serve ACC as their Designated Term Pastor beginning March 3rd!